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Every year Canadians commemorate the sacrifices of millions of our nation’s bravest souls who fought for this country, its people, its values, and each other in the battlefields of the world, from the Great War of 1914 – 1919, the Second World War (1939-1945) and finally the Korean War from 1951 to 1953. Also recognized each year on November 11th, Remembrance Day, are the sacrifices paid by our soldiers on peacekeeping duties throughout the world in the post-World War Two era. November 11th was chosen to serve as Remembrance Day as it is the day on which the Great War ended – the Eleventh Hour, of the Eleventh Day, of the Eleventh Month.

 

Beginning in late October until the end of November 11th, Canadians are asked to wear a red poppy on their dress as a symbol of remembrance and eternal gratitude to those who gave their lives for us. The red flush of the poppy in bloom, noted in the wake of the Battle of the Somme, is the symbol of life reviving and enduring in spite of the destruction caused by war no matter how horrible war can be there is hope for something better to come from it. We have all gained from the sacrifices of those who fought in the wars of this nation - life has come from death and war.

 

Not only Canadians have benefited from the sacrifices of those brave individuals, but so have other nations, from France and Hong Kong in World War Two, to places like Bosnia that have been so highly influenced by the work of Canadian peacekeepers. Canadian soldiers, past and present, have had a tremendous affect on the lives of people in Canada and all over the world and for that, we should never forget them.

 

This year the national Veteran’s Week theme is “The Italian Campaign”, which was the first major ground offensive for Canada during the Second World War. To commemorate this event, CdnMilitary.ca has created this website dedicated to the Battle of Ortona, commonly referred to by many as Canada’s “Stalingrad” due to the fierce fighting our troops experienced in that Italian town.

 

Lest We Forget.

 

 

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